Broad Street Licensing Group Food News

Top Scotch Drinking Countries

April 16th, 2014

The Scotch Whiskey Association has released its report about which countries drink the most of the spirit based on Pounds Sterling (per million) with columns for 2013/2102 and percentage changed:

USA 818.7 758 8
France 434 434 0
Singapore 329.7 339.2 -3
Spain 180 195.3 -8
Germany 172 168.8 1.8
South Africa 163.5 161.6 1
Taiwan 144.6 165.4 -12.5
South Korea 115.4 135.7 -15
Mexico 109.8 91.8 19.5
Brazil 99.1 83.6 18.5
United Arab Emirates 91.5 80.4 14
Australia 84 78.6 7
Latvia 80 79.1 1
India 68.7 61.6 11.5
Venezuela 67.2 102.2 -34
Canada 65.7 63.4 3.6
Poland 60 43.3 38
Japan 60 70.1 -15
Panama 57.9 52.6 10
Netherlands 55.8 49.3 13

The same results by volume of 70cl bottles:

France 177.8 million 153.9m 15.5
USA 127.3m 127.5m -0.17
Singapore 66.8m 64.2m 4
India 61.1m 58.6m 4
Brazil 58m 46.1m 26
Spain 57.5m 60m -4
South Africa 57.3m 53.2m 8
Germany 52.3m 52.5m -0.55
Mexico 40.6m 35.3m 15
Australia 30.2m 26.5m 14
Poland 26.7m 19.2m 39
South Korea 23.5m 26.8m -12
Thailand 23.3m 33.6m -30
Venezuela 21.5m 31.7m -32
UAE 21.4m 19.2m 12
Taiwan 19.5m 22.3m -12
Latvia 18.2m 14m 30
Netherlands 17.4m 15.7m 11
China 16.7m 22.9m -27
Italy 15.6m 16m -3

Be sure to join us at the National Restaurant Show in Chicago on Sunday May 18th for our seminar The Grocerants Are Eating Your Lunch: How Grocery Stores, C-Stores, Drug Stores and Home Delivery Are Taking Away Market Share.

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Florida Grocery Stores Still Liquor-Free

April 15th, 2014

While consumers in California and 34 other states are used to purchasing all sorts of wine & spirits at their local grocery stores, those in other parts of the country can only dream.

And Florida won’t be joining California anytime soon after lobbyists for the state’s liquor stores succeeded in blocking a bill that would have allowed sales of hard booze in food stores.

State Sen. Bill Galvano has thrown in the towel and withdrawn his bill (SB 804) that would have repealed the rule that supermarkets, drugstores and even Walmart could not sell hard liquor alongside groceries. Florida’s law was enacted in 1935 shortly after the repeal of Prohibition, but before the rise of today’s retail giants. Supermarkets can sell beer & wine, but hard booze must be under a separate roof.

ABC, the largest distributor of spirits, made the usual argument that repealing the regulation would put alcohol in the hands of teenagers (as if they can’t get it already), when most observers said this was about the competitive advantage liquor stores have over grocery chains. Target and Walmart were backing the repeal, and cited evidence that sales to minors have actually declined in states where the separation of hard booze and food have been lifted.

Be sure to join us at the National Restaurant Show in Chicago on Sunday May 18th for our seminar The Grocerants Are Eating Your Lunch: How Grocery Stores, C-Stores, Drug Stores and Home Delivery Are Taking Away Market Share.

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More Restaurant Breakfast Wars: Taco Bell vs. Mickey D’s

April 14th, 2014

In a move that has raised hackles with the Golden Arches, Taco Bell is taking on the Egg McMuffin in a series of commercials featuring Ronald McDonald.

No, not the fake spokes-clown for McDonald’s, but real people who are named, well, Ronald McDonald. See the commercial below:

Breakfast has always belonged to McDonald’s. When other chains hawk their breakfast on TV, sales of Egg McMuffins rise. The challenge has been luring customers away from the Golden Arches. While TB’s product may be superior, one realm that restaurant pundits are overlooking is coffee: McDonald’s has lapped its competition by having among the best fast food coffee in the business. Unless Taco Bell can convince diners to drink their morning Joe, the chances of really putting a dent in Ronald McDonald’s clown suit seem slim.

Be sure to join us at the National Restaurant Show in Chicago on Sunday May 18th for our seminar The Grocerants Are Eating Your Lunch: How Grocery Stores, C-Stores, Drug Stores and Home Delivery Are Taking Away Market Share.

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Why Restaurants Continue to Think Inside the Box

April 10th, 2014

Nation’s Restaurant News is the undisputed leader in communicating with the US restaurant industry.

But their articles continue to ignore anything outside the restaurant business. As a result, restaurants are still thinking about how to solve their problems using the old-think of the past.

This article on the new standards for restaurant success by Jim Sullivan is a good example. Jim’s a savvy guy and an industry insider, but his advice is the usual bromides about improving service (“speed, accuracy, cleanliness, no complaints and hospitality”), or making your best practices “industry best practices” and not “company best practices.”

What restaurant leader would advocate dirty, sloppy service that leads to complaints?

Now you can argue that good service is a sine qua non for any restaurant chain, and making sure your stores are clean should be a “duh” moment. But the ticking bomb in his article is that nowhere does he mention retail.

Restaurant chains continue to ignore or hold back from licensing their products to retail. We invite them to rectify this by attending our seminar at the upcoming NRA Show in Chicago May 18th called The Grocerants Are Eating Your Lunch: How Grocery Stores, C-Stores, Drug Stores and Home Delivery Are Taking Away Market Share.

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Explorers Club Goes Hunting Johnny Walker in Court

April 9th, 2014

explorers club

The tweedy Explorers Club is going hunting and the target is Johnny Walker‘s new Explorers’ Club (note the apostrophe) limited edition scotch in a court action citing an obscure law protecting non-profits from commercial exploitation.

US president, naturalist and big game hunter Teddy Roosevelt, underwater pioneer Jacques Cousteau and Arctic explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton have all graced the New York institution’s club house, and now the non-profit is invoking a 100 year-old+ law to block the Diageo mega-brand from selling its sound-alike scotch in duty-free stores here and abroad.

This article in Fortune reports that club members from around the world (there are 26 chapters) are shocked that the scotch bears the club’s name. While protected with a US trademark, the Explorers Club’s mark is not protected from Diageo using the sound-alike name overseas as part of what the brand describes as “the biggest spirits roll-out in history.” Diageo owns and/or distributes some of the world’s largest alcohol brands, including Bushmills Irish whiskey, Captain Morgan rum, Smirnoff vodka, Tanqueray gin, and of course, Broad Street Licensing Group client, Guinness beer.

According to the article, Diageo assumed that it was in negotiations with the club to secure a commercial endorsement when the club hired a big-time law firm which promptly filed two lawsuits: a standard trademark infringement brief in Federal Court, as well as one invoking Section 135 of New York’s General Business Law in State Court. The former would likely play out over time and involve an expensive and complex round of claims and counter-claims about whether consumers would be confused by Johnny Walker’s use of the name. The suit in NY State Court invokes a statute meant to prevent fake charities from scamming the public for contributions. The standard of proof is lower, and only requires that the club prove there would be confusion without the long, complicated (and expensive) trial customary in Federal Court trademark cases.

Apparently if the club wins the case in NY State Court, a permanent injunction would bar Diageo from selling their Explorers’ Club scotch domestically. Legal sources referenced in the article think it’s unlikely the State Court case will go forward, sending the dispute to the higher Federal Court.

In either case, expect the lawyers for both sides to stock up on scotch for a lucrative payday.

NOTE: This post was prepared from materials in the public media and in no way was prepared with any information supplied by Diageo.

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Five Controversial Restaurant Ads

April 8th, 2014

Restaurants face the same advertising challenge as other products: cutting through the ad “clutter.”

Some have chosen, like Carl’s Jr., to go the double-entendre route with sexy ads that some find offensive. Their “great buns” spot below is one ad that got a lot of people hot & bothered for various reasons both positive and negative.

It’s part of a series of five controversial ads collected by Nation’s Restaurant News.

Be sure to join us at the National Restaurant Show in Chicago on Sunday May 18th for our seminar The Grocerants Are Eating Your Lunch: How Grocery Stores, C-Stores, Drug Stores and Home Delivery Are Taking Away Market Share.

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Mozilla Firefox, Gay Rights & Free Speech

April 7th, 2014

firefox_logo

Mozilla Firefox CEO Brendan Eich stepped down last week after it was reported he’d given money to an anti-gay marriage ballot initiative in California in 2008.

The company that distributes the popular web browser came under fire from several sources over Eich’s financial support for Proposition Eight, a ballot measure opposing marriage equality that has since been struck down in court. The furor took off after the online dating site, OK Cupid, asked its members to stop using Firefox, and recommending they switch to Bing, IE or Chrome. At first Mozilla defended its hiring and work policies, insisting it stood for diversity in its employment practices. Further it maintained Eich’s politics were his personal choice, and not relevant to his job heading the company. Eich in a blog post acknowledged the “pain” he had caused, though did not retract or change his views.

The timing of the controversy followed by only days Eich’s hiring to run Mozilla. The company subsequently apologized publicly, saying it had not been prompt enough in addressing the issue, and promising to “do better next time.”

The dispute echoed one in 2012 involving Chick-fil-A‘s CEO Dan Cathy and his family’s charity, Winshape Foundation, which reportedly gave substantial contributions to groups opposing gay rights. The company subsequently scaled back these payments, though after the Supreme Court overturned the Defense of Marriage Act, Cathy Tweeted “Sad day for our nation; founding fathers would be ashamed of our gen. to abandon wisdom of the ages re: cornerstone of strong societies.” The Tweet was later deleted but archived by Topsy, an Internet analytics company.

Whatever your position is on marriage equality, there is the real question whether it’s appropriate to condemn businesses or their executives for private opinions protected by the First Amendment. Our conclusion is twofold:

  1. At a time when corporations are asking to have the same rights as individuals, it’s entirely appropriate that the opinions of its executives compete in the marketplace of public discourse. Corporations can’t have it both ways: right similar to those for human beings, but a pass on the consequences of their actions.
  2. Then there is the practical question: if you make money from selling products or services to the general public, then your actions (and opinions) are going to be closely scrutinized in today’s world, especially with the rise of social media. To expect otherwise is to court disaster.

Corporations can’t have it both ways. As they are treated more and more like human beings, their actions will be judged the same way as human actions are. Whether that’s a good thing or not remains to be seen.

Be sure to join us at the National Restaurant Show in Chicago on Sunday May 18th for our seminar The Grocerants Are Eating Your Lunch: How Grocery Stores, C-Stores, Drug Stores and Home Delivery Are Taking Away Market Share.

 

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Great Food Ad

April 4th, 2014

As part of our “Friday Funnies,” please enjoy this visually creative ad:

Be sure to join us at the National Restaurant Show in Chicago on Sunday May 18th for our seminar The Grocerants Are Eating Your Lunch: How Grocery Stores, C-Stores, Drug Stores and Home Delivery Are Taking Away Market Share.

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April Fool: Saturated Fats Aren’t Bad for You

April 1st, 2014

heart_attack_symptoms_women

For as long as we can remember, it has been accepted knowledge that eating too much saturated fat increases the risk of heart disease.

Wrong.

A “meta-analysis” of 72 separate studies has concluded that the evidence does not support restricting the intake of saturated fatty acids. We’re talking studies of over 6,000 individuals in 18 countries.

And in a blow to health food stores and enthusiasts, the analysis threw cold water on the notion that eating large amounts of polyunsaturated fats, such as omega-3 fatty acid or omega-6 fatty acid, reduces coronary heart disease.

Fish oil makes me sick, so that’s no reason for me to cry.

Surprise, surprise, the study suggests the best way to improve health is quit (or never start) smoking, stay active, and monitor other dietary elements, including salt, sugar and both fruits and vegetables. This article in Meat & Poultry has more specifics.

The American Heart Association did not return phone calls.

Be sure to join us at the National Restaurant Show in Chicago on Sunday May 18th for our seminar The Grocerants Are Eating Your Lunch: How Grocery Stores, C-Stores, Drug Stores and Home Delivery Are Taking Away Market Share.

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Ag Gag Laws Under Fire

March 31st, 2014

¬†With the nasty publicity surrounding media reports about filthy, cramped livestock growers or unsafe and unsanitary meat processing plants, a half dozen states have passed “ag gag” laws that criminalize undercover filming at agricultural facilities.

The laws are controversial since they go to the very concept of a free press, and now Idaho’s law that imposes a $5,000 fine and a year in jail for anyone taking hidden-camera videos at “an agricultural production facility.” Critics say the definition is so broad as to stifle free speech, and is being challenged by a suit filed in the US District Court for the District of Idaho by the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF), People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), the ACLU of Idaho (ACLU), and the Center for Food Safety (CFS).

Although the “overly broad” argument says someone filming in a restaurant or even a public park could be prosecuted, the real question here is whether it harms the public good when companies can keep damning information about questionable practices from the press and by extension, the general public.

Be sure to join us at the National Restaurant Show in Chicago on Sunday May 18th for our seminar The Grocerants Are Eating Your Lunch: How Grocery Stores, C-Stores, Drug Stores and Home Delivery Are Taking Away Market Share.

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